• November
  • 19
  • 2019
  • Erika Armstrong

How old do you feel? How old do you look? How old are you on the inside versus the outside? How old you are might look and feel different if it's the last leg of a five-day trip opposed to the first day! Now that we're living longer, there are...


  • October
  • 28
  • 2019
  • Jodie Boedigheimer

Pilots learn early in their career how to handle engine shutdowns, but there is no checklist for when your flight department shuts down. It’s rare to see a pilot begin and end their career with one company, especially in Business Aviation, so the odds are that you will have either...


  • September
  • 12
  • 2019
  • Advanced Aircrew Academy

Picture this: You're flying over the ocean enroute to a foreign land and, of course, it's a dark and stormy night. You're dealing with building storms and turbulence. Your passengers keep coming to the cockpit to ask if you're there yet. Suddenly, a message comes in from your Data Link...


  • August
  • 19
  • 2019
  • Advanced Aircrew Academy

There are directions on jigsaw puzzles that state "Some assembly required"; on blowtorches "Not to be used for drying hair"; on chain saws "Do not attempt to stop chain with your hands"; and headscratchers on bags of chips that announce "You could be a winner! No purchase necessary. Details inside."...


  • July
  • 16
  • 2019
  • Advanced Aircrew Academy

If you are climbing a mountain, it's best to concentrate on just the next few steps. If you keep looking up to see how much ground you must cover, your frustration will be kept at an elevated level while you remain below it. Pilot training is a bit like trying...


  • July
  • 10
  • 2019
  • Erika Armstrong

Pilots like telling stories. "There I was, in the clouds, one engine out, and the other anti-ice valve stuck in the closed position during a blizzard…" But, better yet, pilots enjoy listening to stories because as visual learners, they will listen to a story and without even realizing they're doing...


  • May
  • 14
  • 2019
  • Advanced Aircrew Academy

Weather Radar Module for Warm Weather Operations Advanced Aircrew Academy's Weather Radar Module covers all of the warm weather-generated hazards that pilots face associated mainly with thunderstorms that can grow rapidly and unpredictably. Spring is a perfect time to refocus on warm weather operations and review those hazards, such as...


  • April
  • 29
  • 2019
  • Erika Armstrong

You’ve thought about it. You’ve looked across the airport and seen the hustle and bustle of all those shiny airliners at the gate and you wonder what their day might be like. You’ve also looked across the ramp at the other flight crews and wondered if their flight coordinator just...


  • April
  • 15
  • 2019
  • Dan Boedigheimer

Since a wet or contaminated runway continues to be the most common causal factor in runway excursions, it is not a surprise to see an increase in them during the winter months. US Part 121 airlines had an increase in number of excursions this winter. Southwest Airlines had 2 runway...


  • April
  • 11
  • 2019
  • Advanced Aircrew Academy

The FAA updates the Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM) twice a year. The latest change was published on February 28, 2019. You can find the latest AIM at https://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/. There were two changes in this latest revision we would like to highlight. Remember that rule you read when you first started flying:...


  • March
  • 04
  • 2019
  • Advanced Aircrew Academy

The value of Safety Management Systems (SMS) training through Advanced Aircrew Academy is in a learning module customized to the unique circumstances of your business. Federal Aviation Regulations represent minimum standards of safety, but good business practices incorporate an international standard and reap the financial reward. When each employee recognizes...


  • January
  • 18
  • 2019
  • Erika Armstrong

The amount of information Business Aviation pilots need to store in their brain would exceed the capacity of most laptop computers. Sure, they fly into the major airports in each state, but they also fly into the 16,000 other airports in the U.S. (about 44,000 worldwide), including private landing strips....


  • January
  • 09
  • 2019
  • Erika Armstrong

Every professional pilot has been taught about Crew Resource Management, but the most important crewmember has been left out of the conversation – the relationship between pilot and airplane automation. Most of these relationships are constantly on the edge of divorce. Neither side is really listening to the other and...


  • January
  • 02
  • 2019
  • Advanced Aircrew Academy

Aircraft Fires. Just saying it sends chills down the spine of all pilots. The FAA published InFO 18013 (11/15/18) from Flight Standards as a caution to aircrews concerning proper inspection and maintenance of Hand-Held Fire Extinguishers. There have been instances where an extinguisher has leaked, and the time of discovery...


  • December
  • 26
  • 2018
  • Advanced Aircrew Academy

There have been several fatal accidents in which the pilot could not identify and pull a circuit breaker (autopilot) during an abnormal or emergency situation. Aside from the risk of fire, the FAA has also identified another risk of resetting a circuit breaker in flight. SAFO 18014 Following are some...


  • November
  • 20
  • 2018
  • Erika Armstrong

As the first snowflakes fall, you can hear Business Aviation pilot brains in the Northern Hemisphere scrolling through their knowledge bank trying to remember all the nuances of winter weather operations. Procedures, training, clean wing, Type I-IV fluids, sequence, HOT tables, and pre-takeoff contamination checks are thoughts that roll from...


  • October
  • 23
  • 2018
  • Advanced Aircrew Academy

What is winter operations training? The dangers inherent to operating aircraft in winter conditions are numerous. Operating on wet and/or contaminated runway surfaces, complying with the clean aircraft concept and compensating for the effects of cold temperature altimetry errors are subjects that flight crew should train on an annual basis....


  • October
  • 17
  • 2018
  • Dan Boedigheimer

Rick Miller walked into the loosely organized university flight school fresh out of the Air Force just hired as the new Chief Flight Instructor. We had 30 young flight instructors going in 31 different directions. Rick spoke of creating SOPs, Edward Deming's Total Quality Management points, and was an early...


  • October
  • 11
  • 2018
  • Dan Boedigheimer

Defining Normalization Of Excellence This year's theme of the Bombardier Safety Standdown is the Normalization of Excellence. How do you define Normalization of Excellence?  Tony Kern, in his article The Normalization of Excellence Sounds cool – what is it?, says the definition may not be commonly understood and one goal for...


  • October
  • 09
  • 2018
  • Erika Armstrong

As Socrates stood at the front of his class trying to teach the next generation, I'm sure Plato did something that made his teacher shake his head in frustration. Maybe Plato stayed out too late the night before, partying with Aristotle and other philosophers. I'm sure Plato told Socrates at...


  • October
  • 01
  • 2018
  • Advanced Aircrew Academy

Most business aviation pilots have DUATs in their past. Introduced in 1989, it was the FAA's first attempt at automated flight information services. Gone are the 297 Flight Service Stations and the days of in-person weather briefings; however, Flight Service has always been the mainstay of aviation services. Leidos Pilot...


  • September
  • 21
  • 2018
  • Advanced Aircrew Academy

The nature of aviation is that it's constantly changing. The FAA is rearranging its website, moved some key pieces of information, and didn't leave a breadcrumb trail for you. One of the handy web links used by Business Aviation pilots operating international flights changed locations and even if you Google...


  • September
  • 18
  • 2018
  • Advanced Aircrew Academy

Standard Phraseology Methods of aviation communication are constantly changing. Clear, concise communication is the basis of aviation safety. One letter, one number, one wrong readback can be the difference between life and death. It is one the most important elements when flying in controlled airspace, yet how can clear communication...


  • September
  • 11
  • 2018
  • Erika Armstrong

It's -14 degrees F outside, but it's not cold enough to keep the phone from ringing at 0200. "Hello?" "Hey captain, we have to get a heart and lung transplant medical team from Flying Cloud to Aberdeen, right now. A young, healthy snowmobiler was drinking and driving and there is...


  • September
  • 04
  • 2018
  • Erika Armstrong

In Part I of the High Altitude Environment article, we talked about Aviation Medicine and Long-term Effects of Atmospheric Changes on pilot health. Long-term Tracking of Pilot Health When a pilot has a medical issue, they don't usually go to their flight physician. Flight physicians have the power to take...


  • August
  • 30
  • 2018
  • Erika Armstrong

Aviation Medicine Since I was going to be nearby for flight simulator training, my chief pilot wanted me to go to the high-altitude chamber training on the other end of town. I'd never been in one, so I thought it would be a great opportunity to purposely starve my brain...


  • August
  • 27
  • 2018
  • Advanced Aircrew Academy

Business aviation/corporate pilots are notorious kleptomaniacs. They really don't have to steal the swag or aviation promotional merchandise, but they still have the "recurrent inability to resist urges to take items that you generally don't need and that usually have little value" ... to someone else. but, to a pilot, aviation...


  • August
  • 22
  • 2018
  • Advanced Aircrew Academy

No Need To Remove Your Clothes TSA x-ray technology can see through them! Security is in the headlines again as a TSA working group is considering ending screening at more than 150 small and medium sized airports. The proposal has triggered conversation and the overwhelming response is that security is...


  • August
  • 07
  • 2018
  • Advanced Aircrew Academy

Aviation has so many acronyms, it's often difficult to know if SEBENA or CPDLC is a noun or a verb. The lingo gives the appearance of being complicated and helps keep aviation consultants busy, but one acronym that the Business Aviation world has agreed upon is simple: IS-BAO. The International...


  • August
  • 02
  • 2018
  • Chris Tranbarger

Having recently read an industry publication discussing complacency in cockpit operations, I took some time to discuss the subject with a few of my counterparts and reflect on how to recognize it and combat it. Thinking I know what complacency means to me, I nonetheless gave consideration to what the...


  • July
  • 31
  • 2018
  • Erika Armstrong

There is a tipping point. In that moment, when a passenger with a strong financial portfolio makes the decision to buy, charter, join a membership, or fraction of a corporate aircraft, there are factors to push that decision, and they aren't always obvious. When a passenger has the power to...


  • July
  • 26
  • 2018
  • Erika Armstrong

There is a tipping point. In that moment, when a passenger with a strong financial portfolio makes the decision to buy, charter, join a membership, or fraction of a corporate aircraft, there are factors to push that decision, and they aren’t always obvious. When a passenger has the power to...


  • July
  • 24
  • 2018
  • Erika Armstrong

There is a tipping point. In that moment, when a passenger with a strong financial portfolio makes the decision to buy, charter, join a membership, or fraction of a corporate aircraft, there are factors to push that decision, and they aren’t always obvious. When a passenger has the power to...


  • July
  • 19
  • 2018
  • Erika Armstrong

Does your flight department have/want Ops Spec C056 authorization or a Letter of Authorization to conduct Controller Pilot Data Link Communications? Last December, the FAA released Notice 8900.446 stating operators with current authorization for use of CPDLC would be required to apply for a revised A056 authorization by March 29,...


  • July
  • 17
  • 2018
  • Erika Armstrong

Business Aviation pilots have to wait, a lot. A four-hour flight can be filled with bad weather, ATC, and mechanical challenges, followed by four long, boring days on a layover, waiting for passengers. Back at home base, pilots wait to hear when the MELs will be cleared, wait to hear...


  • April
  • 23
  • 2018
  • Jim Weaver

The International Standard for Business Aircraft Operations (IS-BAO), aka the Standard, has been streamlined and modernized in 2018. The International Business Aviation Council’s (IBAC) IS-BAO team went on a listening tour to gather feedback from operators and auditors. The IS-BAO Standards Board produced a significant revision based on the feedback...


  • April
  • 16
  • 2018
  • Jared VanLue

Security. We say it. We follow procedures for it. We train and test on it. As we pass more than 15 years since the terrorist attacks of 9/11, the sands of time have begun to blur our perceived need for aviation security. I admit I fall into that way of...


  • April
  • 09
  • 2018
  • Chris Tranbarger

Regardless of your vocation, it’s highly likely you must rely on certain tools to accomplish your objectives and get the job done. In a literal sense, a carpenter uses numerous different tools to build and construct a project such as a hammer, saw, drill, etc. In a broader sense, a...


  • March
  • 27
  • 2018
  • Sheila Wallace

Unlike other industries that require drug and alcohol testing, most pilots rarely go into the office. So, while on a trip, who is the supervisor that will report the appearance, behavior, speech, and smell that are usually associated with drug or alcohol use? The company cannot require testing based on...


  • March
  • 12
  • 2018
  • Anna Kozak

The FAA has issued draft Advisory Circular (AC) 90-66B on operating procedures at non-tower airports. This draft is the first revision to the AC since 1993 and contains many changes, including controlled airports when towers are not in operation and drone operation. Drones do not require authorization to operate at...


  • March
  • 04
  • 2018
  • Anna Kozak

The initial results are in for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) 10 most frequently cited workplace safety violations for fiscal year 2017. The rankings for OSHA's Top 10 most cited violations vary little (some change in order) from year to year; however, violation number nine Fall Protection, Training...


  • February
  • 15
  • 2018
  • Greg Lamb

'Simple' is probably not a word you would associate with a government website, but get ready for a brave new world, at least when it comes to the State Department website and travel information. New improvements at travel.state.gov are in the works to make it easier to find and interpret...


  • February
  • 08
  • 2018
  • Jared VanLue

A few days ago, I was finishing an uneventful flight and landing on runway 26L at KLAS (Las Vegas, NV - USA). The weather was VMC around 2200L with wind 080 at 7 knots, so it was a direct tailwind. Due to a lot of operational restrictions, ATC doesn't like...


  • February
  • 01
  • 2018
  • Anna Kozak

Currently, the FAA is working with operators, manufacturers, and installers on eliminating several common ADS-B installation errors. The issues most commonly associated with an ADS-B installation are: Missing Barometric Pressure Altitude Air/Ground Determination Issues Flight ID issues including Missing Flight ID 3-letter identifier Duplicate and Wrong ICAOs Invalid Mode 3/A...


  • January
  • 25
  • 2018
  • Ryan Retelle

Many of our daily activities are aided by the coverage of GPS satellites providing many of our devices with a precise location. It is really convenient when traveling in an unfamiliar city to quickly locate a coffee shop for that morning cup of joe. The inconvenience quickly becomes edgy when...


  • January
  • 18
  • 2018
  • Anna Kozak

OSHA issued a final rule that will require employers to electronically submit worker injury and illness data, which then will be made public. The original compliance date of July 1, 2016 was delayed until December 15, 2017 to allow affected employers additional time to become familiar with the electronic reporting system....


  • January
  • 11
  • 2018
  • Jared VanLue

I recently went to recurrent simulator training and the instructor had a different scenario planned for one of the practice sessions. Apparently, there have been some recent GPWS "saves" of aircraft going into KLAS (Las Vegas, NV - USA) after being cleared for a visual approach to runway 26L. The...


  • January
  • 03
  • 2018
  • Ryan Retelle

The freezing temperatures that are sweeping across the Northern parts of the country have captured the attention of the nightly news. The sub-zero temperatures are causing many to rethink how and what can be accomplished outdoors. Some may be fortunate to travel South to warmer locations while others are dealing...


  • December
  • 12
  • 2017
  • Anna Kozak

There are many factors involved in the communication process. Of all the factors, the most important may be Phraseology as it equips us to communicate rapidly, with desired results, and reduces circumstances for misunderstanding, all without being affected by differences in language. As indicated in SKYbrary, standard phraseology reduces the...


  • November
  • 13
  • 2017
  • Dan Boedigheimer

Number 2 on our Top 10 list to prevent runway excursions is knowing the actual runway conditions. In runway excursions on a contaminated runway, we often find that the runway conditions were worse than anticipated or reported. I suspect this was the case when a Citation Mustang touched down earlier...


  • October
  • 30
  • 2017
  • Anna Kozak

The Iridium satellite communications network provides global coverage, including over the polar regions. Through inter-satellite cross links, which allow voice calls to be relayed from one satellite to the next until ground-based Gateway is reached, Iridium Satellite network enables data connectivity, allowing for CPDLC communication in remote coverage areas. Recent...


  • October
  • 26
  • 2017
  • Sheila Wallace

All operators take notice. It’s time to update our manuals to replace DOT Chart 15 with the updated DOT Chart 16. The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) has published the latest version of the Hazardous Materials Markings, Labeling, and Placarding Guide as DOT Chart 16. The hot button...


  • October
  • 16
  • 2017
  • Jared VanLue

Did you know that the TSA recently released some updated guidance to the Twelve Five Standard Security Program (TFSSP) regarding the Ground Security Coordinator duties and training? As the Security Subject Matter Expert (SME) for Advanced Aircrew Academy, I've reviewed the new changes and have incorporated the new information and...


  • October
  • 12
  • 2017
  • Jared VanLue

A few days ago, I was climbing out behind an airliner that had departed about a minute before us. I was the pilot monitoring for a relatively new copilot and, during departure, I told him, "If we get rocked, stay off the rudders." The airplane I fly these days has...


  • October
  • 10
  • 2017
  • Chris Tranbarger

It's highly possible that I'm one of those pilots that actually enjoys flying in the Colorado mountain airports of Aspen, Eagle/Vail, Rifle, Telluride, and Hayden. Each offers its own challenges of surrounding terrain, runway limitations, instrument approaches, unique weather patterns, and arrival/departure paths. And each offers little, if any, room...


  • October
  • 04
  • 2017
  • Erika Armstrong

Editor’s Note: Advanced Aircrew Academy (AAA) and the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) are collaborating on how best to gather the needs of business aviation, address the pilot shortage, and find innovative ways to provide solutions. Since each category of operations impacts the other, we will analyze the challenges of...


  • September
  • 05
  • 2017
  • Erika Armstrong

Editor's Note: Advanced Aircrew Academy (AAA) and the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) are collaborating on how best to gather the needs of business aviation, address the pilot shortage, and find innovative ways to provide solutions. Since each category of operations impacts the other, we will analyze the challenges of...


  • August
  • 28
  • 2017
  • Marve Ellis

No – your Flight Attendant has not gone to another dimension or life or where ever you believe good flight attendants go at the end of their lives. Our beloved FA (which somehow stands for area forecast) will soon be (mostly) just a fond memory. Soon you'll be telling the...


  • August
  • 22
  • 2017
  • Anna Kozak

There are some differences between CPDLC that is used in oceanic airspace and other regions of the world as part of FANS 1/A and the ATN-B1 type of CPDLC being implemented in Europe, which the Europeans have branded Link 2000+. It is possible for an airplane to be equipped with...


  • August
  • 16
  • 2017
  • Erika Armstrong

Aviation Gods thrive on watching pilots learn. They are proud of us as we muddle our way through our ratings while they throw a variety of weather and mechanical challenges at us. They giggle as we bounce a few landings, panic when we realize we're lost, and they hold their...


  • August
  • 14
  • 2017
  • Phil Taylor

The concept that a grooved runway surface, when wet, can be considered "effectively dry" was washed away for me one rainy day at South Bend, IN (KSBN). I had enough experience in my aircraft to know that a certain amount of brake pressure would yield a certain amount of deceleration...


  • August
  • 11
  • 2017
  • Sheila Wallace

On July 10, 2017, former Anheuser-Busch CEO August Adolphus Busch IV was arrested after police say he tried to fly a helicopter while allegedly intoxicated. Officers reported Busch had "mumbled and slurred" speech to the point "it was difficult to understand" and that he was unable to follow some directions....


  • July
  • 13
  • 2017
  • Jared VanLue

During a recent descent, I was faced with a difficult decision about what altitude I was supposed to descend to. I had been cleared to "DESCEND VIA" the ANTHM3 RNAV into KBWI. As you can see from the image, the lowest altitude listed for landing to the east is 4000'...


  • July
  • 10
  • 2017
  • Ryan Retelle

This past winter, general aviation pilots around the Northeast had the opportunity to purposely land on an icy runway. The snow was plowed to create a 2300' x 100' runway for about a two-week window in February. This provided recreational pilots a destination in Alton Bay, NH to land their...


  • July
  • 05
  • 2017
  • Jared VanLue

Something I've been thinking about lately regarding security has nothing to do with the airplane. I'm pretty adventurous on layovers and like to explore different cities. It's one of the perks of the job, right? I often go out alone because it's usually daytime and I'm a fast walker. I'm...


  • July
  • 03
  • 2017
  • Ryan Retelle

The summer season is a great time to enjoy some refreshing lemonade, get your list of house projects completed, and attend the Takeoff and Landing Performance Assessment (TALPA) Update Meeting hosted by the FAA. On July 11-12, 2017, stakeholders who are involved in the TALPA process will attend a working...


  • June
  • 29
  • 2017
  • Dan Boedigheimer

InFO 17006, Use of the Localized Aviation Model-Output-Statistics (MOS) Program (LAMP), Weather Product. The FAA doesn't even keep you in suspense. They give it away in the short title they give to their InFO products. Don't worry, there won't be a quiz at the end and it is not likely...


  • June
  • 26
  • 2017
  • Chris Tranbarger

Regulatory reform. The phrase alone generally tends to make one cringe. Why? Because when we hear it, we expect more regulation, and regulation by its very nature creates limits, prohibitions, and/or requirements on how we conduct ourselves and our businesses in the course of operating aircraft for a living. I'll...


  • June
  • 20
  • 2017
  • Tony Wallace

We were in Morristown, NJ (MMU) for a trip to Bedford, MA (BED). It was a relatively short flight and our last leg of the day. We would be at the hotel before dark and would be the end of a great day of flying. The weather at Morristown was...


  • June
  • 16
  • 2017
  • Tony Wallace

Mayday, Mayday, Mayday!! You are cruising along at FL410, and you have just crossed 30 West eastbound to Dublin, Ireland. So far, everything has been uneventful and you have about three hours remaining in your flight. You are actually becoming bored and ready to get to your destination, when suddenly...


  • June
  • 13
  • 2017
  • Sheila Wallace

I was doing some research for a Part 135 Operator regarding dry ice. In the process, I discovered that there have been very few reported incidents involving carbon dioxide incapacitation aboard aircraft resulting from the sublimation of dry ice. In the incidents that have been reported, the aircrew recognized symptoms...


  • June
  • 01
  • 2017
  • Anna Kozak

Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) is fundamental to the foundation in the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). The FAA mandate is to install ADS-B Out equipment for aircraft flying in US airspace by January 1, 2020 (above 10,000 feet or in Class B or C airspace); however, aircraft...


  • May
  • 30
  • 2017
  • Anna Kozak

Until January 2008, ICAO's standards and recommended procedures (SARPs) required only that aviation personnel in contact with international flight operations master a set of words and phrases known as "ICAO Radio Telephony Phraseology." As you might imagine, there is a significant difference between a relatively limited set of technical aviation...


  • May
  • 25
  • 2017
  • Anna Kozak

In January 2017, new OSHA rules tightened the requirements to help prevent falls from ladders and raised work platforms. The new rules are primarily focused on the construction industry, but also apply to aviation maintenance technicians workers in hangars. Incorporated in the new rule are advances in technology, industry best...


  • May
  • 22
  • 2017
  • Tony Wallace

We were enroute from Guadalajara, Mexico (MMGL) to Laredo, TX (KLRD). Laredo was a Customs stop. We only had one short leg after Laredo and we would be done for the day. It was early afternoon; the weather was beautiful. The Big Sky, Little Airplane theory is wide open spaces,...


  • May
  • 17
  • 2017
  • Jared VanLue

Remember our initial discussion on the Hawker 700 crash in Akron, OH? If not, review that blog post. Many people wonder "why didn't the Captain take over"? In this situation, I actually agree with the PIC's decision to let the SIC fly the leg. I've come to the conclusion that...


  • May
  • 12
  • 2017
  • Tony Wallace

We departed Punta Gorda, FL (KPGD) enroute to Houston Hobby (KHOU) and were cleared to climb to 11,000 feet. The weather was typical for southern Florida in the spring time—2000 Broken and 10 miles. A couple of minutes after takeoff, while climbing above the broken layer, we received a TA...


  • May
  • 10
  • 2017
  • Jared VanLue

The NTSB released their factual report of a Hawker 700 crash in Akron, OH (KAKR) a few months ago, and the facts are a little disturbing. As usual, it's never the one event that causes an accident, but a combination of factors. As a CFI-I with 20 years of experience, type...


  • April
  • 27
  • 2017
  • Tony Wallace

You are rapidly climbing to FL370. Your requested flight level is 390, but ATC has restricted you to FL370 due to an Airbus 319 flying in the opposite direction and maintaining FL380. You are climbing very well today and your rate of climb is 3000 feet/min. When you pass FL361...


  • April
  • 11
  • 2017
  • Chris Tranbarger

On March 31, 2017, President Donald Trump reappointed Robert Sumwalt to a two-year term as vice chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and announced his intention to renominate Sumwalt to another five-year term on the board. Vice Chairman Sumwalt is a pilot's pilot serving on the board, not...


  • March
  • 07
  • 2017
  • Phil Taylor

The FAA recently released an updated version of the Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge (PHAK) and there have been some changes that are worth noting. What was formerly an entire 24-page PHAK Appendix devoted to Runway Incursion Avoidance in the last issue has been compressed to 6 pages in Chapter...


  • March
  • 01
  • 2017
  • Greg Lamb

You have been examined and issued a medical by the AME, the mechanics have completed the aircraft inspections, your international paperwork has been checked and double checked, and your preflight checks are all done. Are you ready for your international flight? You may be, but is your passport? The condition...


  • January
  • 09
  • 2017
  • Greg Lamb

With a new year comes new challenges, but Father Time is poised to deliver flight crews operating in North America a belated holiday gift. New regulations, guidance, policies, and procedures are commonplace for pilots, so we will gladly welcome changes that simplify our lives. In 2016, ICAO recommended that member...


  • December
  • 19
  • 2016
  • Sheila Wallace

Every now and then, the aviation gods drop a gem in your lap such as this—a lawyer attempting to drop the charges against his client. His client is a pilot who, fortunately, was stopped before (allegedly) flying intoxicated. The facts at hand are this: Blood alcohol content 0.343 (8 times...


  • November
  • 29
  • 2016
  • Anna Kozak

ADS-B surveillance technology allows aircraft to use GPS to share accurate position data with ATC and other aircraft. Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) is the standard generic term for satellite navigation systems with global coverage. GPS is specific to the United States' GNSS system. This allows continuous and automatic broadcasts...


  • September
  • 28
  • 2016
  • Ryan Retelle

Within the Notice to Airman Publication (NTAP) Part 4, Graphic Notices Section 1, General – Cold Temperature Restricted Airports, is a list of updated airports that are affected when cold temperatures influence the terrain clearance for instrument approach procedures. Pilots are instructed to apply a cold temperature error correction (Temp...


  • August
  • 10
  • 2016
  • John Frazier

Overview The FAA is advising U.S. Part 135 operators that they soon will need a "State recognized" (FAA) Safety Management System (SMS) to fly throughout Europe under Europe's Third Country Operators (TCO) regulation. Part 135 operators based outside of Europe will be required to obtain a TCO authorization from the...


  • July
  • 26
  • 2016
  • Ryan Retelle

"N91AA braking action is reported as medium by a Gulfstream and the RCC is 3/3/3." Are you ready to hear that from ATC? On approach is not the time to look at the pilot next to you and ask “What does RCC of 3 mean?" The FAA will begin using...


  • May
  • 31
  • 2016
  • Sheila Wallace

I have the opportunity to view many operations manuals. One of the places where operators differ related to Dangerous Goods is the acceptance, or not, of Portable Oxygen Concentrators (POCs). The revision to FAA Advisory Circular (AC) 120-95A, Portable Oxygen Concentrators is an excellent opportunity for operators to adapt their...


  • May
  • 20
  • 2016
  • Dan Boedigheimer

The only constant in business aviation is change. When operating Part 91 within the United States, there is no requirement for a Letter or Authorization (LOA) to fly RNAV SIDs and STARs. If your aircraft is properly equipped, the pilots have been trained, and you file the correct equipment codes...


  • May
  • 02
  • 2016
  • Tony Wallace

The first post in this series introduced the recently published Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Advisory Circular (AC) 90-48D Pilots’ Role in Collision Avoidance. In this second post, we’ll look at best practices identified in AC 90-48D for avoiding midair collisions (MAC) and near midair collisions (NMAC). Statistics indicate that the...


  • May
  • 02
  • 2016
  • Tony Wallace

Advisory Circular (AC) 90-48D Pilots’ Role in Collision Avoidance was published on 19 April 2016 for the purpose of alerting all pilots to the potential hazards of midair collisions (MAC) and near midair collisions (NMAC). The AC also emphasizes problem areas related to human causal factors where improvements in pilot...


  • April
  • 28
  • 2016
  • Anna Kozak

June 1, 2016 is OSHA’s final deadline for implementing requirements within the new Hazard Communication Standard. The changes are bringing the United States into alignment with the Globally Harmonized System Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS), ever improving workers’ safety and health protections. The new system is being implemented throughout...


  • February
  • 28
  • 2016
  • Nat Iyengar

As of February 4, 2016, MNPS (Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications) Airspace is being dumped as a term and replaced by the much more user friendly NAT High Level Airspace or NAT HLA. MNPS first came into being in 1977, and this change is significant in that the requirements for approval...


  • December
  • 10
  • 2015
  • Anna Kozak

Approximately 75% of all delays in the National Airspace System occur due to delays in the NY Metropolitan Area airspace. As we have experienced, these delays determine the course of the aviation industry on a daily basis. The ability to transport passengers and goods in a timely and cost-effective manner...


  • December
  • 10
  • 2015
  • Anna Kozak

In 1983, OSHA promulgated the Hazard Communication Standard (HCS), (CFR 29 1910.1200) to establish uniform requirements for the evaluation of chemical hazards by the manufacturer. It is referred to as the "Worker Right to Know" standard. The standard's purpose ensured that the hazards of all chemicals produced or imported are...


  • December
  • 03
  • 2015
  • Anna Kozak

Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC), also known as Data Comm within United States Airspace, links pilots and ground controllers to communicate information regarding current or future flight of the aircraft. Available since the 1990s, this capacity has been used for Oceanic communications. Since 2009, the FAA has worked with...


  • November
  • 29
  • 2015
  • Anna Kozak

The FAA mandate to install Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) Out equipment for aircraft flying in U.S. airspace by January 1, 2020 (above 10,000 feet or in Class B or C airspace) is in the not-so-distant future. Aircraft operating in some countries' airspace must already be compliant. Now, there's...


  • November
  • 11
  • 2015
  • Nat Iyengar

Last month in our newsletter, we posted an article on the implementation of Reduced Lateral Separation Minimum (RLatSM) in the North Atlantic. This briefing summarizes the changes. Advanced Aircrew Academy has an eLearning module available to cover the changes. The changes are detailed in NAT OPS Bulletin 2015 - 003....


  • November
  • 06
  • 2015
  • Nat Iyengar

Many countries require advance passenger information system (APIS) filing requirements for general aviation (GA). Cuba recently initiated such an APIS requirement for inbound flights. It is important that operators understand Cuba is in a very fluid situation with regards to access for GA flights. How do you file your Cuba...


  • October
  • 27
  • 2015
  • Jim Weaver

Part 135 operators who depend on FAA inspectors rather than their own check airman for testing and checking of pilots should note that the NBAA and FAA have worked together to update the Flight Standards Inspector Resource Program (FSIRP) policy to ensure better access to National Resource Inspectors (NRIs). According...


  • September
  • 24
  • 2015
  • Jared VanLue

Did you know that Loss of Control – Inflight (LOC-I) has now overtaken CFIT as the leading cause of aircraft accidents worldwide? The FAA, EASA, and ICAO have made LOC-I / Upset training one of their "hot button" issues in an effort to reduce the number of fatalities. Inadvertent stalls...


  • September
  • 17
  • 2015
  • Dan Boedigheimer

September 17, 2015 is the magical day. Applying cold temperature corrections to certain instrument approaches goes from being recommended to being mandatory. Pilots without temperature compensating aircraft must calculate and make a manual cold temperature altitude correction for cold temperature restricted airports to the designated segment(s) of the approach using...


  • September
  • 03
  • 2015
  • Dan Boedigheimer

The book Sway: The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior reminds me of the writing style of Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner in their books Freakonomics, Surperfreakonomics, and Think Like a Freak. Similar to Levitt and Dubner, Ori Brafman and Rom Brafman use behavioral economics as a lens to explain what...


  • August
  • 04
  • 2015
  • Dan Boedigheimer

The book The Glass Cage: Automation and Us by Nicholas Carr goes beyond the scope of aviation and reviews automation in cars, manufacturing, and the medical field. The book provided a good review of general automation philosophy principles along with some operational takeaways that can immediately be implemented in the...


  • June
  • 23
  • 2015
  • Sheila Wallace

My previous flying job was at a large fractional operator. When flying with a large pilot group, you will come across pilots with varied backgrounds, different personalities, and quirks. One of those interesting quirks I found was those pilots that want to spend more time in the bar than the...


  • June
  • 09
  • 2015
  • Tony Wallace

We are not all in the habit of using transponders on the ground since we do not want to “set off” a TCAS TA or RA for a landing aircraft; however, TCAS units inhibit TCAS TAs and RAs when we are within 500 (+/- 100) feet of the ground. Our...


  • May
  • 12
  • 2015
  • John Frazier

Here is a sample of so-called Safety Performance Goals that show up in the plain brown wrapper that we get from the doc store.  As most of us are buying from the same three or four document providers, we see the same ones often: Encouraging all employees to participate by...


  • May
  • 06
  • 2015
  • John Frazier

When we layer on a non-precision approach coupled to our FMS ability to VNAV down a VDP from the FAF to the runway, the plot really thickens.  If you have been flying lots of VNAV VDPs down to near the pavement without any problem, you are definitely in the danger...


  • April
  • 23
  • 2015
  • John Frazier

  Third and last on our list, Cabin crew safety training has been rolled into IS-BAO 5.3.1 to provide the same emergency procedures and equipment training to anybody who has duties on the airplane (“all aircraft crewmembers”). The separate section on cabin crew safety training, with its list of specific...


  • February
  • 24
  • 2015
  • Jim Weaver

  If a crewmember who is required to take a test or a flight check under this part, completes the test or flight check in the calendar month before or after the calendar month in which it is required, that crewmember is considered to have completed the test or check...


  • February
  • 17
  • 2015
  • John Frazier

  The two most frequently cited sources are AC 90-108, Use of Suitable Area Navigation (RNAV) Systems on Conventional Routes and Procedures, and the AIM, in Paragraph 1-2-3. As the current AIM language is basically a repeat of portions of AC 90-108, let’s focus on the AC. As it turns...


  • February
  • 10
  • 2015
  • John Frazier

  This year and every year, IS-BAO registered operators need to review, interpret, document, and then implement the changes that are applicable to their operation. As an example, Advanced Aircrew Academy has completed the review and assessment for applicability of the entirety of the 2015 revisions for a client. This...


  • February
  • 03
  • 2015
  • Dan Boedigheimer

After seeing an advertisement by Aviation Supplies & Academics (ASA) for the book Pilots In Command: Your Best Trip, Every Trip I preordered a copy weeks before the release. The description of the book was it offered “solid advice from real pilot to student and professional aviators alike about how to...


  • January
  • 27
  • 2015
  • Jared VanLue

  OK, but what’s the cost of NOT going around? What is the damage to your and your company’s reputation when you go sliding off the end into the EMAS with the buckets fully deployed? When was the last time you heard about a plane on social media doing a...


  • January
  • 21
  • 2015
  • Dan Boedigheimer

  The crew was able to get one engine restarted at 10,000 feet and landed safety in Sarasota, FL. The incident was a wakeup call to prepare for what I previously thought was an impossibility. In Captain Dave Montgomery’s book Blue Water Ditching: Training Professional Crewmembers for the Unthinkable Disaster, he...


  • January
  • 13
  • 2015
  • Dan Boedigheimer

One change to discuss with your Part 142 training provider is incorporating hands-on training on use of the oxygen mask, mask settings, communicating with masks donned, and venting of smoke goggles. From a policy perspective, a review of your smoke, fire, or fumes checklists and SOP guidance is recommended. The...


  • January
  • 08
  • 2015
  • Anna Kozak

Relatively new regulations require aircraft operating in designated classes of airspace (about anywhere a transponder is required) to be equipped with ADS-B Out beginning January 1, 2020. The FAA has issued a new Advisory Circular (AC), 90-114A to facilitate operations, including general operating procedures and performance and training requirements, when...


  • December
  • 31
  • 2014
  • Ryan Retelle

When required to make this altitude correction, pilots must also inform ATC so that the controller can ensure appropriate vertical separation is applied between known traffic. Be sure to announce where and how much you will be applying the correction factor. These corrections should not be applied while being radar...


  • December
  • 16
  • 2014
  • Sheila Wallace

  Quest Diagnostics, a large independent testing lab, reported that in 2013, after 10 years of decline, drug test positivity is on the rise fueled primarily from the use of marijuana and amphetamines. Even though the aviation workforce has a very low positive drug and alcohol test rate compared to...


  • November
  • 06
  • 2014
  • Anna Kozak

Given the FAA’s stated exercise of its legislative authority, OSHA historically has not attempted to enforce the provisions of the OSH Act with respect to flight deck crew on an aircraft in operation. Where the FAA has not preempted OSHA from enforcing its standards and regulations, OSHA generally has exercised...


  • October
  • 23
  • 2014
  • Dan Boedigheimer

  Since Dr. Reason has been researching and publishing for the better part of 40 years, I recommend this book, “A Life in Error,” as the first book of his that you read. The book does not go into the level of detail to learn the intricacies of each of...


  • October
  • 16
  • 2014
  • John Frazier

TO: Manager of External Change Your Operation FROM: AAA SUBJECT: Upcoming Airspace and IFR Procedural Changes The rolling stone that constitutes NextGen is picking up additional momentum following the North Texas airspace redo in November. We would have expected a pause to regroup and refresh, but this performer is going...


  • October
  • 14
  • 2014
  • John Frazier

Data Comm is an important component of the total NextGen system. Elements of it have been in live operational trials at Memphis and Newark since 2011, with the general rollout commencing in June, 2015 at SLC, IAH, and HOU. Another 56 airports are planned to be online by the end...


  • October
  • 03
  • 2014
  • John Frazier

Here is AAA’s thinking on just this one revision item: Fatigue Risk Management Program Affected Sections: 4 – Organization and Personnel Requirements, 6 – Flight Operations, Appendix B – Implementation Guidance. Section 4.8 has been added to the Standard and to the Protocols, and Recommended Practices have been added to...


  • September
  • 29
  • 2014
  • John Frazier

This particular conundrum has compliance consequences for you Part 135 and 121 operators out there, but the lines are open and opinions welcome from anyone who wants to chime in. Here is the set up: The Instrument Procedures Handbook (IPH), in Chapter 1, Departure Procedures, states the following: The FAA...


  • September
  • 22
  • 2014
  • Dan Boedigheimer

When I downloaded the AC, the first thing I noticed was it did not grow in length. Identical to the original publication, AC 91-79A is still 39 pages long. My assumption based on the same page count was the changes were going to be minimal. A closer attention to detail...


  • September
  • 19
  • 2014
  • John Frazier

With apologies to all of you who operate out of airports in the North Texas Metroplex, the fact is that your airspace and procedures rollover, scheduled for September 18, will be the second in the series, following Houston’s launch on May 28. Hopefully you can find some comfort in the...


  • September
  • 16
  • 2014
  • Anna Kozak

The Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) technology is often a topic in most recent aviation headlines. Just in the last few weeks, ADS-B has been a recurring theme in the AIN publication. See the links below for more information on these updates to ADS-B. Aircraft Tail Blocking Complicated by...


  • September
  • 11
  • 2014
  • Phil Taylor

  When was the last time you let perfectly good runway slip by as you searched for that sweet touchdown? Did it occur to you that if you are still flying, then you are not stopping? Consider the certification parameters. The test pilot, in order to produce the data in...


  • August
  • 28
  • 2014
  • Dan Boedigheimer

When Raytheon first published wet and contaminated runway performance data for the Beechjet, it was included in an AFM supplement with the subtitle “non-FAA approved.” The data was added to the AFM for operators in other countries that required wet and contaminated to be published for the equivalent of a...


  • August
  • 26
  • 2014
  • John Frazier

  At the moment the new site is in test mode, so if you are a user (heh heh), the existing www.raimprediction.net is still where you need to go for the prediction service. While you are there, you can also read all about the migration to the new site and...


  • August
  • 21
  • 2014
  • Dan Boedigheimer

Would you apply wet runway landing performance numbers in that instance? That is one of the key challenges in determining accurate landing distance data. At 200 knots 10 miles from the airport, how can you accurately assess runway condition at an uncontrolled airport? Sure you could always be conservative and...


  • August
  • 20
  • 2014
  • John Frazier

  One of my own epiphany moments in the world of instrument procedures occurred when I first understood that individual procedures, as published on the chart I was staring at, have to be devised so that they can be safely flown by everything from a Cessna 150 to a G...


  • August
  • 14
  • 2014
  • Dan Boedigheimer

The NTSB’s probable cause of the accident points the responsibility squarely on the pilots. “The pilot’s failure to maintain proper airspeed, which resulted in the airplane touching down too fast on the wet runway with inadequate runway remaining to stop and a subsequent runway overrun. Contributing to the landing overrun...


  • August
  • 05
  • 2014
  • Sheila Wallace

Are you used to flying mostly within US airspace? Watch out for the meaning of ATC instructions outside of the US. They may not be the same. EuroControl recently issued a safety briefing aimed at US pilots concerning the use of ‘AT PILOTS DISCRETION’ and ‘WHEN READY’ climb and descent clearances....


  • July
  • 31
  • 2014
  • Sheila Wallace

  What does that mean for the rest of us? Learn from the mistakes of others. Know if your employees are actually in safety sensitive positions. Ensure ALL of your safety-sensitive employees are in the random drug testing pool. Receive verified negative test results for all employees hired or transferred...


  • July
  • 07
  • 2014
  • John Frazier

What we too often do not know these days is that Climb Via was rolled out on April 3 and what it’s procedures are, that the Houston Metroplex converted over to an all new airspace management plan on May 29 and all the old STARs and SIDs went bye-bye, that...


  • June
  • 27
  • 2014
  • Jared VanLue

Early estimates show about a 7 - 15% increase in traffic flow, and that will probably get better as controllers and pilots become more comfortable with the new separation. It takes a little getting used to seeing another airplane clear the runway when you’re on short final, but when the...


  • June
  • 23
  • 2014
  • Jared VanLue

Have you ever heard of KCM? If you’re not a Part 121 pilot you probably haven’t. Known Crewmember (KCM) is a risk-based initiative used by Part 121 airlines and the TSA that allows vetted crewmembers to bypass security screening at certain airports. If your company frequently moves you around on...


  • June
  • 19
  • 2014
  • Nat Iyengar

New Oceanic Entry Points With the removal of the Fish Points and other long-known waypoints, Gander has created a completely new list of Oceanic Entry Points (OEPs). They start at AVPUT in the far north and run down to SUPRY. The image below shows some the OEPs highlighted in yellow....


  • June
  • 02
  • 2014
  • John Frazier

Consistent with the April rollout of Climb Via Procedures, you should be prepared to get these when departing a Houston area airport, including especially IAH and HOU; most likely in the form of an initial clearance to an intermediate altitude. Traffic conditions will determine this. If you are not yet...


  • May
  • 28
  • 2014
  • Dan Boedigheimer

Battery Life A new section has been added to the AC on useful battery life. Useful battery life must be established and documented for your battery-powered EFBs. You must have either (1) an established procedure to recharge the battery from aircraft power during flight operations, (2) useful battery life for...


  • May
  • 01
  • 2014
  • Anna Kozak

Advanced Aircrew Academy offers a full complement of OSHA courses, including Hazardous Materials and the new Hazard Communication Standard, CFR 29 1910.1200, which now provides workers with the right to understand information they are provided in the workplace. The next New Hazard Communication Standard mandatory compliance date is June 1,...


  • April
  • 24
  • 2014
  • Jared VanLue

For those of you capable of receiving a Predeparture Clearance (PDC), have you noticed a change since the first week of April? The FAA changed the way it issues PDCs. Gone are the days of trying to decide if you got a reroute in the PDC. The FAA recognized there...


  • April
  • 21
  • 2014
  • Phil Taylor

When Center controllers serve as Approach controllers, they usually have much less capability to see other traffic down low because their antenna site is just too far away from the airport they are controlling. I was the pilot flying and my partner had been making all the required calls on...


  • April
  • 16
  • 2014
  • John Frazier

  Instrument Departure Procedures -– Paragraphs 5-2-8. The revisions start on page 5-2-9 and these are important. They include the AIM version of the new Climb Via procedures plus some much needed clarification of what’s going on when ATC vectors us off of a published DP/SID. Based on reviews of...


  • April
  • 14
  • 2014
  • Sheila Wallace

So be on the lookout. Canned oxygen comes in a variety of brands and sizes, ranging from four to 22 ounces and can easily be slipped in a carry-on bag. Although the HMR contain exceptions allowing airline passengers and crew to carry a limited amount of hazardous materials that are...


  • April
  • 08
  • 2014
  • Sheila Wallace

Get ahead of the process and make sure that all of your aircraft have the latest and greatest PED authorization. For further information, refer to InFo13010 and InFo13010SUP.


  • April
  • 03
  • 2014
  • Anna Kozak

You may have asked yourself, “Why the FAA has established ADS-B technology?” and “Why is it important to me as a pilot?” Here are Advanced Aircrew Academy’s Top Nine reasons why ADS-B is important to flightcrews: 1. ADS-B is an environmentally friendly technology that enhances safety and efficiency while benefiting...


  • March
  • 13
  • 2014
  • John Frazier

As an auditor, your humble blog writer here can easily imagine the many practical reasons that operators might cite in explaining why they were not quite meeting the Standard for SMS training – demand (Just too busy!), changes in the organization (Fred retired and it fell through the cracks), and...


  • February
  • 27
  • 2014
  • Dan Boedigheimer

For our online training module on Wake Turbulence at Advanced Aircrew Academy, we have added additional training pages as well as updated about half of the existing training pages with new information from this AC. This highlights our nimble capability to keep training updated and relevant for flight crews. Within...


  • February
  • 12
  • 2014
  • John Frazier

Notice that we reported above that ADS B-Out is the part mandated by 2020. That’s because that is the core technological piece that replaces radar in the NextGen. How the “In” component will evolve for airplane operators remains to be seen, as in will it trump other currently available sources...


  • February
  • 03
  • 2014
  • John Frazier

Summary of the Summary: When issued a “Climb Via” or “Descend Via” clearance, comply with all published procedure restrictions unless specifically told otherwise by ATC. You can access InFO 12014 directly at this web address: http://content.govdelivery.com/attachments/USAFAA/2014/01/29/file_attachments/266243/InFO12014.pdf There is also an FAA training video available at: http://www.faa.gov/tv/?mediaId=507 There you have it....


  • January
  • 16
  • 2014
  • Anna Kozak

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) acceptance award, Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP), recognizes small employers (those with fewer than 250 employees) who operate an admirable safety and health management system. Recognition by OSHA with a SHARP award is an achievement of status that can distinguish you...


  • January
  • 03
  • 2014
  • Nat Iyengar

As of December 31, 2013, any aircraft arriving or departing Mexico (including U.S. Part 135 and 91 operators) is required to transmit an Advance Passenger Information System (APIS) manifest to the National Immigration Institute (INM) of Mexico. Mexico decided to add the requirement primarily to assist in their security efforts...


  • December
  • 17
  • 2013
  • Ryan Retelle

Tis the season for aircrews to make a seasonal adjustment to their operational mindset. This change is forced by the onset of frigid air masses pushing named winter storms across the continent. As aircrews are reminded to pack their heavy coat, gloves, and hat for comfort, they are also reminded...


  • December
  • 12
  • 2013
  • Dan Boedigheimer

Do you still have a suggestion box hanging in the hallway or break room in your office? While suggestion boxes provided an anonymous way to provide feedback to your organization, they were rarely used effectively. All too often, the boxes would go unchecked, sending a clear message that the feedback...


  • December
  • 09
  • 2013
  • Anna Kozak

The December 1 deadline to train employees on the implementation of the Globally Harmonized System of Chemical Classification (GHS) into the existing Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) has come and gone. In this New Hazard Communication Standard, employers were mandated to train (the right to know and understand) their workers on...


  • December
  • 07
  • 2013
  • Dan Boedigheimer

  My AME said the easiest thing to do was issue me a new medical. He’s awesome and was able to call OKC with my data and get a Special Issuance within a day. The FAA is a lot more accepting of sleep apnea as long as it’s treated. It’s...


  • December
  • 03
  • 2013
  • Anna Kozak

The Bureau of Labor Statistics recently released its annual Occupational Injuries and Illnesses report, which estimates that three million workers were injured on the job in 2012. Following this announcement, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued, on November 19, 2013, a proposed rule to improve workplace safety and...


  • November
  • 25
  • 2013
  • Dan Boedigheimer

It’s been many years since I closed a bar and heard the “last call for alcohol” yell across the room. These days, I hear a similar chant from the beer vendor before the last out of the 7th inning. Well, here is Advanced Aircrew Academy’s last call for OSHA training...


  • November
  • 22
  • 2013
  • John Frazier

In our courses and conversations, we’ve been observing that LORAN is gone, NDBs are headed out the door, and VORs are next. A presentation at the most recent Aeronautical Charting Forum described the VOR shutdown program in more detail. The name of the formal plan to reduce the number of operational...


  • November
  • 19
  • 2013
  • Anna Kozak

New Alphabet Soup: NextGen’s ADS-B Surveillance Technology Language is depicted through a standard set of letters or graphemes/symbols called an alphabet. Soup is primarily a liquid food that is made by combining ingredients. The alphabet of NextGen’s new soup spells ADS-B. Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) is a new...


  • November
  • 15
  • 2013
  • Anna Kozak

GHS Workplace Label Requirements Deadline The deadline for employers to train employees on the concepts of the Globally Harmonized Standard of Chemical classification is December 1, 2013. This training requirement applies to all employees that use, handle, or store hazardous chemicals. Chemicals that may seem benign to us, such as...


  • November
  • 12
  • 2013
  • Dan Boedigheimer

In October 2012, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) published Safety Alert for Operators (SAFO) 12007 on Categorization (RECAT) of Wake Turbulence Separation Categories at Memphis International Airport (MEM). The RECAT was based on research by the FAA, Eurocontrol, scientific experts in wake, and experts in safety and risk analysis. Fast...


  • November
  • 07
  • 2013
  • Dan Boedigheimer

Have you ever wondered what the International Standard for Business Aircraft Operations (IS-BAO) training requirements actually are? Figuring out what training is required according to the IS-BAO is not simple or straightforward. The Standards are lengthy and complex, largely due to the range of operations that they cover. Veterans of...


  • November
  • 04
  • 2013
  • Anna Kozak

New GHS Standard Compliance Deadline Less Than One Month Away Less than one month remains for employers to train employees on the Globally Harmonized System of Chemical Classification (GHS). The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) mandated the training of thousands of flight department employees by December 1, 2013 to...


  • October
  • 14
  • 2013
  • John Frazier

File Accurately: We pilots, by nature being both practical critters and not looking for extra work, are sometimes shooting ourselves in the foot in three ways – by filing for departure times ahead of what we really expect; by defaulting to filing ‘GPS Direct’ routings, and in some cases, by not...


  • September
  • 25
  • 2013
  • Nat Iyengar

Additionally, 50 NM longitudinal separation minimum will be applied for appropriately authorized and equipped RNP-10 certified aircraft. New York ARTCC will continue to accommodate aircraft that are not eligible for 30 NM lateral / 30 NM longitudinal separation minima throughout the CTA. Lateral, longitudinal, and vertical separation minima for these...


  • September
  • 20
  • 2013
  • Dan Boedigheimer

Holdover times and Regression information When you go to the Aircraft Ground Deicing page on the FAA web site to retrieve Holdover Time Tables this year you will see another document is available: 2013-2014 Regression Information. This is the first year the FAA has published this document, although a similar...


  • September
  • 12
  • 2013
  • Anna Kozak

On August 27, 2013, the FAA released a new Rule Making Document: Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Standards for Aircraft Cabin Crewmembers (www.regulations.gov, docket number FAA -2012-0953). This rule making includes Hazard Communications, Bloodborne Pathogens, and Noise Protection policies for Aircraft Cabin Crewmembers. This action becomes effective September 26, 2013....


  • September
  • 05
  • 2013
  • Jared VanLue

Wake Turbulence – KLAS On a recent 110 degree day in KLAS (Las Vegas, NV), I was faced with an interesting wake turbulence situation. We were next in line for takeoff at 25R behind a Boeing 737. The tower controller cleared the 737 for takeoff, cleared us to Line Up...


  • August
  • 27
  • 2013
  • John Frazier

I was flying an ILS in the sim a few years back, night of course, everything as it should be; on speed, in the window with “George” connected and doing the usual good work, when about halfway down the GS the sim crashed. I mean simulated an impact with the...


  • August
  • 21
  • 2013
  • Anna Kozak

The primary hope for each of these standards is a significant decline in occupational injury and illness nationwide. In addition, these standards aim to increase employers’ monetary profit by reducing workman’s compensation costs, employee loss and downtime, and litigation. “Excellence is an art won by training and habituation.” “We are...


  • August
  • 16
  • 2013
  • John Frazier

  Controlled Flight Into Terrain (5.1.3 Note) Crew Resource Management/Human Factors (5.2) Fatigue Management (6.13) High Altitude Operations (5.4) International Procedures, including RVSM, MNPS, and RNP (5.1.3 Note; 7.3) International SOPs (7.5.1) ILS LDA PRM Approaches (FAA; AIM 5.4.3) MEL Use (5.1.3 Note; 8.15.2) Occupational Health and Safety (U.S. -...


  • August
  • 06
  • 2013
  • Anna Kozak

The new OSHA Hazard Communication standard mandates that Business Aviation Flight Departments train the thousands of Flight Department employees by December 1, 2013 for improved understanding on identification of and protection from hazardous chemicals in the workplace. The HCS will be fully implemented in 2016. Advanced Aircrew Academy guides your...


  • July
  • 26
  • 2013
  • John Frazier

Here is the example of an IS-BAO compliant Advanced Aircrew Academy course list (with IS-BAO references) that might be recommended for fixed-wing pilots at Acme Widgets: Courses to be taken every 24 Months Emergency Situations and Equipment (5.1.3; 5.3.1) HAZMAT/Dangerous Goods (5.1.3; 14.1.3) Winter Operations/Surface Contamination (5.1.3) Courses that cover...


  • July
  • 17
  • 2013
  • John Frazier

Other/Extra: These training subjects are not specifically mentioned within the IS-BAO but could be an elective for the operator, based on hazards identified by your SMS. Examples include Mountain Flying and Weather Radar. Using the guidance above for the Emergency Situations topic, here is the complete list of Advanced Aircrew...


  • July
  • 11
  • 2013
  • John Frazier

In order to ensure complete compliance with the Standard, you should complete a comprehensive analysis of the training requirements of the IS-BAO, State requirements (FAA in the U.S.), and any additional company requirements.  (Do you require a PIC check-out before operating into KASE?  Training on ramp operations?  On aircraft servicing...


  • July
  • 08
  • 2013
  • John Frazier

The first variable is the training subjects: Surface Contamination, CRM/Human Factors, Dangerous Goods, and so on. It‘s fair to say that you will definitely need a complete list of all of the subjects to start the process. It is very important to keep in mind that IS-BAO is but one...


  • July
  • 03
  • 2013
  • John Frazier

HEADLINE: Advanced Aircrew Academy Lands First Ever Client Operating Totally Unmanned Fleet! Well, not yet anyway, although you may have seen the FAA’s Notice of June 25 advising that the special committee on Minimum Operational Performance Standards for Unmanned Aircraft Systems will meet on July 30th. It’s no wonder that...


  • June
  • 25
  • 2013
  • Dan Boedigheimer

Advanced Aircrew Academy is adding a new online course to their extensive catalog of eLearning courses available to pilots. The Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC) course is approximately 1 hour long and includes the following topics: Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Contract (ADS-C) Flight Planning Connecting with Air Traffic Services...


  • June
  • 10
  • 2013
  • Dan Boedigheimer

The VREF / VSO speed did not change for the Beechjet, so why change the approach category?  The FSB said because of the limitation to fly at Ref +5 for a coupled approach they determined that should move the aircraft to be in approach category C. The coupled approach speed...


  • June
  • 03
  • 2013
  • Dan Boedigheimer

It is anticipated that the runway construction at KSFO will be complete by August 22nd and the ILS and LDA PRM approaches will be back in service. The RNAV (GPS) PRM approach is destined to have the same fate as the Microwave Landing System (MLS). Although the FAA says they...


  • May
  • 13
  • 2013
  • Dan Boedigheimer

Charlie’s insight into life after an accident is inspiring to learn. Apply the safety lessons now; not after something happens to you. He completely accepts responsibility for the accident and does not play the role of a victim. “You had control, you made choices, and you caused the accident.”  ...


  • May
  • 07
  • 2013
  • John Frazier

  During the flight debrief the pilot monitoring asked the pilot flying what was up with that controller clearing them for the straight in approach, then telling them they could circle at their discretion. The answer lies in changes to the ATC approach clearance phraseology. If your aircraft is RNAV-equipped,...


  • May
  • 03
  • 2013
  • Dan Boedigheimer

In Captain Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger’s book Highest Duty my favorite quote is “you never know upon which flight your career will be judged.” Captain Palm’s career will be judged on his expertise in handling a dual-engine flameout and dead stick landing into Jacksonville, FL on November 28, 2005.   Jay was...


  • May
  • 01
  • 2013
  • Dan Boedigheimer

  The aircraft exited IMC conditions on the other side of the thunderstorm while descending 3000 fpm at FL370. The aircraft was now clear of the storm with passengers alert and wide eyed looks on their face. The remainder of the flight was quiet on the flight deck. How was...


  • April
  • 25
  • 2013
  • John Frazier

Here are the new criteria, shown in the table below.  With this change, if you were planning to circle at Denver’s Centennial (KAPA) in a Category C aircraft, you would have 3.0 NM to maneuver instead of the previous 1.7, due to the airport’s 5885 feet elevation. As with the...


  • April
  • 17
  • 2013
  • Anna Kozak

Under the OSH Act, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was established within the Department of Labor and was authorized to regulate health and safety conditions for all employers with few exceptions. OSHA covers private sector employers and employees in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and other...


  • April
  • 12
  • 2013
  • Dan Boedigheimer

Time to update your manuals, the Department of Transportation has published DOT Chart 15: Markings, Labeling, and Placarding Guide. Advanced Aircrew Academy has updated our Dangerous Goods / Hazmat course with the updated chart. {phocadownload view=file|id=5|text=DOT Chart 15|target=s}


  • April
  • 05
  • 2013
  • Dan Boedigheimer

  The limiting factor in using an airport with only GPS approaches in your alternate determination was the Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM) section 1−1−19 - Global Positioning System (GPS). “Any required alternate airport must have an approved instrument approach procedure other than GPS that is anticipated to be operational and...


  • April
  • 03
  • 2013
  • John Frazier

  ADS-B (Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast) — The satellite-based, data-linked system that will replace the current ATC radar-based management of the National Airspace System. ADS is happening now in the U.S., with full implementation mandated by 2020. FAA rulings on equipment standards and implementation dates are in place. Basically,...


  • April
  • 01
  • 2013
  • Dan Boedigheimer

  The FAA strongly recommends specific guidance and improved flight crew training for use of TCAS. Advisory Circular 120-55C, Aircraft Operational Approval and Use of TCAS II provides operators with best practices for guidance related to TCAS usage and information that you should include in your training program. The FAA...


  • January
  • 12
  • 2013
  • Dan Boedigheimer

Advanced Aircrew Academy can deliver either individual courses or a group of courses as part of a flight department proficiency program and/or to meet your International Standard for Business Aircraft Operations (IS-BAO) training needs. You can select the group of courses you want from any of those listed on our...



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