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New OSHA Standards for Aircraft Cabin Crewmembers

New OSHA Standards for Aircraft Cabin Crewmembers

  • September
  • 12
  • 2013
  • Anna Kozak

On August 27, 2013, the FAA released a new Rule Making Document: Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Standards for Aircraft Cabin Crewmembers (www.regulations.gov, docket number FAA -2012-0953). This rule making includes Hazard Communications, Bloodborne Pathogens, and Noise Protection policies for Aircraft Cabin Crewmembers. This action becomes effective September 26, 2013.

This policy statement is meant to enhance occupational safety and health in the aircraft cabin by establishing the extent to which the Occupational Safety and Health Administration requirements may apply to the working conditions of aircraft cabin crew while they are onboard aircraft in operation. For the purposes of this policy, an aircraft cabin crewmember means a person assigned to perform duty in an aircraft cabin when the aircraft is in operation (other than flight crewmembers). The issue of flight crewmember safety and health issues is outside the scope of this policy change.

Would this new rule extend to flight crewmembers when they perform cabin passenger safety functions? No. Flight crewmembers are not aircraft cabin crewmembers; therefore, this policy change does not apply to them. Along with Flight Attendants, any other person (i.e., cargo handlers, medical personnel, supernumeraries, and evacuation crewmembers) assigned to perform duty in an aircraft cabin when the aircraft is in operation (other than flight crewmembers) would be covered by this policy.

Does this new ruling apply to you? All Part 135 air charter operations, Part 91 corporate flight operators operating business jets, and commercial aircraft operations that utilize at least one aircraft cabin crewmember must participate in this new ruling. OSHA jurisdiction is limited to the boundaries of the United States and its territories and possessions; therefore OSHA standards would not be applicable on U. S. aircraft operations conducted outside the United States.

Pilots’ safety and a host of health issues, such as fatigue, heat and humidity of the work environment, contamination by rain repellant and other chemicals, laser strikes, cosmic radiation, ozone, aircraft disinsection, contagious disease, contamination of cockpit oxygen masks, smoke-protection masks in the cockpit, and ambient flight deck noise are beyond the scope of this OSHA policy statement this time.

Advanced Aircrew Academy can satisfy your training needs. Hazard Communication, Bloodborne Pathogens, and Noise Protection are just a few examples of our OSHA courses offered, including the New Hazard Communication Standard.


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