If There's Not A FICON NOTAM, It Doesn't Mean The Runway Is Dry

If There's Not A FICON NOTAM, It Doesn't Mean The Runway Is Dry

Number 2 on our Top 10 list to prevent runway excursions is knowing the actual runway conditions. In runway excursions on a contaminated runway, we often find that the runway conditions were worse than anticipated or reported. I suspect this was the case when a Citation Mustang touched down earlier this month on an icy runway.

It was an early season snow storm in the Midwest where the temperatures hovered near freezing. Thirty-two hours prior to the excursion, a FICON NOTAM was published for RWY 21 FICON 1/1/1 100 PCT ICE OBS. According to the Runway Condition Assessment Matrix (RCAM)…

Read more: If There's Not A FICON NOTAM, It Doesn't Mean The Runway Is Dry

Iridium Ban by Oceanic ATC

Iridium Ban by Oceanic ATC

The Iridium satellite communications network provides global coverage, including over the polar regions. Through inter-satellite cross links, which allow voice calls to be relayed from one satellite to the next until ground-based Gateway is reached, Iridium Satellite network enables data connectivity, allowing for CPDLC communication in remote coverage areas.

Recent equipment issues with Iridium Satellite service for ATC comms (CPDLC) have prompted a ban by a number of Oceanic ATC agencies. The FAA Central Reporting Agency (CRA) investigator provided the following explanation, "If Iridium receives an ACARS uplink but is unable to deliver it to the Iridium SATCOM avionics, then…

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Time to Update your Operations Manual for DOT Chart 16

Time to Update your Operations Manual for DOT Chart 16

All operators take notice. It’s time to update our manuals to replace DOT Chart 15 with the updated DOT Chart 16.

The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) has published the latest version of the Hazardous Materials Markings, Labeling, and Placarding Guide as DOT Chart 16.

The hot button topic continues to be lithium battery handling. There have been several incidents involving both lithium primary (non-rechargeable) and lithium-ion (rechargeable) batteries, and PHSMA is attempting to stay ahead of the power curve by adding new lithium battery markings and warning labels.

For those of us who need DOT Chart 16…

Read more: Time to Update your Operations Manual for DOT Chart 16

TSA Twelve Five Standard Security Program (TFSSP) Changes

TSA Twelve Five Standard Security Program (TFSSP) Changes

Did you know that the TSA recently released some updated guidance to the Twelve Five Standard Security Program (TFSSP) regarding the Ground Security Coordinator duties and training?

As the Security Subject Matter Expert (SME) for Advanced Aircrew Academy, I've reviewed the new changes and have incorporated the new information and requirements into our TSA Security eLearning module for Inflight Security Coordinators (ISC) and Ground Security Coordinators (GSC).

Since the TFSSP is Sensitive Security Information (SSI), the training and information is only available to those operators that have a TFSSP program established with the TSA. What I can say is that if…

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Use Of Rudder During A Wake Turbulence Event

Use Of Rudder During A Wake Turbulence Event

A few days ago, I was climbing out behind an airliner that had departed about a minute before us. I was the pilot monitoring for a relatively new copilot and, during departure, I told him, "If we get rocked, stay off the rudders." The airplane I fly these days has a fly-by-wire system, but I knew that the copilot had come from a conventional flight control aircraft. I wasn't sure what his training had been about rudder usage during a wake turbulence roll event, but my company teaches us to not use rudder inputs in case of a roll upset.…

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A Valley So Low, A Mountain So High

A Valley So Low, A Mountain So High

It's highly possible that I'm one of those pilots that actually enjoys flying in the Colorado mountain airports of Aspen, Eagle/Vail, Rifle, Telluride, and Hayden. Each offers its own challenges of surrounding terrain, runway limitations, instrument approaches, unique weather patterns, and arrival/departure paths. And each offers little, if any, room for erroneous or careless decision making and subpar airmanship.

My first flights into the Colorado mountains were in a twin-turbine propeller aircraft conducting commuter airline operations at Durango, Cortez, Montrose, and Grand Junction. Though these airports are not without their challenges, things changed when I began flying charter flights in…

Read more: A Valley So Low, A Mountain So High

More Articles ...

  1. Empty Cockpits: On Demand, In Demand - Part II
  2. Empty Cockpits: Corporate Flight Departments - Part I
  3. RIP FA
  4. CPDLC – Europe-Specific Procedures
  5. Aviation Mountain Gods: Enter the Mosh Pit
  6. Feeling Groovy?
  7. Too High To Fly?
  8. Descend To What Altitude?
  9. Ready For A Break From The Summer Heat?
  10. Out And About Personal Security
  11. TALPA Update Meeting 2017
  12. LAMP - Another Acronym To Remember
  13. Regulatory Reform
  14. TCAS Resolution Advisory in IMC
  15. Medical Divert Procedures
  16. Dry Ice Dangers
  17. Human Factors and ADS-B
  18. It’s All Greek To Me - Multiple Language Users on the Same Frequency
  19. New OSHA Fall Protection Rule - Are You Compliant?
  20. Big Sky, Little Airplane
  21. Loss of Control Leads to CFIT - Part 2
  22. "Maintain Vertical Speed, Maintain"
  23. Loss of Control Leads to CFIT - Part 1
  24. "Traffic, Traffic"
  25. What Do We Really Know About the NTSB?
  26. The Most Important Sign At The Airport
  27. When Was The Last Time You Gave Your Passport A Checkup?
  28. Canadian Climb and Descend Via Phraseology
  29. Flying High . . . Almost
  30. Let The Buyer Beware
  31. Taking A Closer Look At Applying Temp Comp
  32. Part 135 Operators SMS in Europe Requirement
  33. It's Not Snowing Yet, But . . .
  34. What You Need to Know About the Updated FAA AC 120-95A on Portable Oxygen Concentrators
  35. Training to Obtain LOA C063
  36. 33 Years In The Making: The Pilot's Role In Collision Avoidance, Part 2
  37. 33 Years In The Making: The Pilot's Role In Collision Avoidance, Part 1
  38. Are You Ready For OSHA's June 1, 2016 Hazard Communication Deadline?
  39. Did You Know MNPS Is Over?
  40. CPDLC-DCL in the NY Metropolitan Airspace
  41. OSHA'S Hazard Communication Standard Deadlines
  42. CPDLC - DCL Coming to an Airport Near You in 2016
  43. ADS-B OUT Exemptions for 2020 Deadline
  44. NAT RLatSM Briefing 2
  45. Cuba Update
  46. Flight Standards Inspector Resource Program
  47. Losing Control
  48. Let the Winter Games Begin!
  49. Book Review - Sway: The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior
  50. Book Review The Glass Cage: Automation and Us by Nicholas Carr

Follow The Agonic Line

The Agonic Line blog focuses on aviation training. Advanced Aircrew Academy brings you articles written by subject matter experts in their field on topics of interest for business aviation flight department managers and pilots. Through insightful content it is our goal to reduce declination and show the course direct to true north on aviation training issues.

Agonic Line - An imaginary line on the Earth's surface connecting points where the magnetic declination is zero. The agonic line is a line of longitude on which a compass will show true north.