Safe Travels

Safe Travels

'Simple' is probably not a word you would associate with a government website, but get ready for a brave new world, at least when it comes to the State Department website and travel information.

New improvements at travel.state.gov are in the works to make it easier to find and interpret safety/security information for any country in the world. Each country will be assigned a color coded 'Travel Advisory' level (1-4) which will give an immediate indication of the country's status.

In addition to theTravel Advisory level, the textual explanation of each country’s safety and security considerations will be simplified…

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Wake Turbulence Hazard When Landing With A Tailwind

Wake Turbulence Hazard When Landing With A Tailwind

A few days ago, I was finishing an uneventful flight and landing on runway 26L at KLAS (Las Vegas, NV - USA). The weather was VMC around 2200L with wind 080 at 7 knots, so it was a direct tailwind. Due to a lot of operational restrictions, ATC doesn't like turning the airport around to land east unless the wind is greater than 10 knots. I operate out of LAS frequently, so I'm used to this and plan for it my landing calculations.

What I WASN'T ready for was how much the wake vortex of the aircraft ahead of me…

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Problematic ADS-B Installation

Problematic ADS-B Installation

Currently, the FAA is working with operators, manufacturers, and installers on eliminating several common ADS-B installation errors. The issues most commonly associated with an ADS-B installation are:

  • Missing Barometric Pressure Altitude
  • Air/Ground Determination Issues
  • Flight ID issues including Missing Flight ID 3-letter identifier
  • Duplicate and Wrong ICAOs
  • Invalid Mode 3/A Code — Mitigation in place
  • Incorrect Emitter Category
  • Aircraft with Position Errors

The FAA noted the issues in an ADS-B installation technical paper. Most prevalent are incorrect ICAO codes, and a high number of installations have been completed with an improper emitter category code. The FAA also noted, in an…

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Hot Coffee And GPS Coverage

Hot Coffee And GPS Coverage

Many of our daily activities are aided by the coverage of GPS satellites providing many of our devices with a precise location. It is really convenient when traveling in an unfamiliar city to quickly locate a coffee shop for that morning cup of joe. The inconvenience quickly becomes edgy when our navigation device can’t locate itself due to poor satellite reception causing a delay in our caffeine consumption.

However, it is much more disruptive when our RNAV system in the flight deck lacks satellite reception and we are limited to navigate using traditional Class I methods. Generally, the coverage of…

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Electronic Reporting Of Workplace Injuries And Illnesses To OSHA Required For Certain Aviation Companies

Electronic Reporting Of Workplace Injuries And Illnesses To OSHA Required For Certain Aviation Companies

OSHA issued a final rule that will require employers to electronically submit worker injury and illness data, which then will be made public. The original compliance date of July 1, 2016 was delayed until December 15, 2017 to allow affected employers additional time to become familiar with the electronic reporting system.

Employers with 250 or more workers are mandated by the Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illness final rule to electronically submit OSHA's Form 300A on an annual basis. Employers with 20 to 249 employees in certain high-hazard industries, including scheduled air transportation and support activities for air transportation, are required…

Read more: Electronic Reporting Of Workplace Injuries And Illnesses To OSHA Required For Certain Aviation Companies

When To Start Descent After Getting Cleared For The Visual

When To Start Descent After Getting Cleared For The Visual

I recently went to recurrent simulator training and the instructor had a different scenario planned for one of the practice sessions. Apparently, there have been some recent GPWS "saves" of aircraft going into KLAS (Las Vegas, NV - USA) after being cleared for a visual approach to runway 26L. The aircraft are about 20 miles east/southeast of the SHAND fix and are descending to the minimum crossing altitude of 4900' for that fix. If you look at the IAP for 26L, you see a mountain peak at 5365'. There have now been several reports of aircraft descending early before the…

Read more: When To Start Descent After Getting Cleared For The Visual

More Articles ...

  1. Arctic Airmass Issues
  2. Radio Communication Techniques: ICAO Phraseology
  3. If There's Not A FICON NOTAM, It Doesn't Mean The Runway Is Dry
  4. Iridium Ban by Oceanic ATC
  5. Time to Update your Operations Manual for DOT Chart 16
  6. TSA Twelve Five Standard Security Program (TFSSP) Changes
  7. Use Of Rudder During A Wake Turbulence Event
  8. A Valley So Low, A Mountain So High
  9. Empty Cockpits: On Demand, In Demand - Part II
  10. Empty Cockpits: Corporate Flight Departments - Part I
  11. RIP FA
  12. CPDLC – Europe-Specific Procedures
  13. Aviation Mountain Gods: Enter the Mosh Pit
  14. Feeling Groovy?
  15. Too High To Fly?
  16. Descend To What Altitude?
  17. Ready For A Break From The Summer Heat?
  18. Out And About Personal Security
  19. TALPA Update Meeting 2017
  20. LAMP - Another Acronym To Remember
  21. Regulatory Reform
  22. TCAS Resolution Advisory in IMC
  23. Medical Divert Procedures
  24. Dry Ice Dangers
  25. Human Factors and ADS-B
  26. It’s All Greek To Me - Multiple Language Users on the Same Frequency
  27. New OSHA Fall Protection Rule - Are You Compliant?
  28. Big Sky, Little Airplane
  29. Loss of Control Leads to CFIT - Part 2
  30. "Maintain Vertical Speed, Maintain"
  31. Loss of Control Leads to CFIT - Part 1
  32. "Traffic, Traffic"
  33. What Do We Really Know About the NTSB?
  34. The Most Important Sign At The Airport
  35. When Was The Last Time You Gave Your Passport A Checkup?
  36. Canadian Climb and Descend Via Phraseology
  37. Flying High . . . Almost
  38. Let The Buyer Beware
  39. Taking A Closer Look At Applying Temp Comp
  40. Part 135 Operators SMS in Europe Requirement
  41. It's Not Snowing Yet, But . . .
  42. What You Need to Know About the Updated FAA AC 120-95A on Portable Oxygen Concentrators
  43. Training to Obtain LOA C063
  44. 33 Years In The Making: The Pilot's Role In Collision Avoidance, Part 2
  45. 33 Years In The Making: The Pilot's Role In Collision Avoidance, Part 1
  46. Are You Ready For OSHA's June 1, 2016 Hazard Communication Deadline?
  47. Did You Know MNPS Is Over?
  48. CPDLC-DCL in the NY Metropolitan Airspace
  49. OSHA'S Hazard Communication Standard Deadlines
  50. CPDLC - DCL Coming to an Airport Near You in 2016

Follow The Agonic Line

The Agonic Line blog focuses on aviation training. Advanced Aircrew Academy brings you articles written by subject matter experts in their field on topics of interest for business aviation flight department managers and pilots. Through insightful content it is our goal to reduce declination and show the course direct to true north on aviation training issues.

Agonic Line - An imaginary line on the Earth's surface connecting points where the magnetic declination is zero. The agonic line is a line of longitude on which a compass will show true north.