CPDLC – Europe-Specific Procedures

CPDLC – Europe-Specific Procedures

There are some differences between CPDLC that is used in oceanic airspace and other regions of the world as part of FANS 1/A and the ATN-B1 type of CPDLC being implemented in Europe, which the Europeans have branded Link 2000+.

It is possible for an airplane to be equipped with only FANS 1/A, or ATN-B1, or both; therefore, an airplane that is capable of using CPDLC over the North Atlantic may not be capable of CPDLC throughout Europe, and airplanes that are CPDLC capable in Europe may not be capable over the North Atlantic or in many other areas of…

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Aviation Mountain Gods: Enter the Mosh Pit

Aviation Mountain Gods: Enter the Mosh Pit

Aviation Gods thrive on watching pilots learn. They are proud of us as we muddle our way through our ratings while they throw a variety of weather and mechanical challenges at us. They giggle as we bounce a few landings, panic when we realize we're lost, and they hold their breath when we forget to turn on the carburetor heat. They cheer as we strap into our first jets and yell "Yee Haw" each time we get past V1 and rotate. But, they especially enjoy the day we think we know it all. My Aviation God smirked the day it…

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Feeling Groovy?

Feeling Groovy?

The concept that a grooved runway surface, when wet, can be considered "effectively dry" was washed away for me one rainy day at South Bend, IN (KSBN). I had enough experience in my aircraft to know that a certain amount of brake pressure would yield a certain amount of deceleration on a dry runway. On this day, however, the anti-skid was going crazy with that level of brake pressure and got my attention. Fortunately, there is lots of runway at KSBN and everything was fine. Once I had a moment to reflect, I began to contemplate the possible reasons why…

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Too High To Fly?

Too High To Fly?

On July 10, 2017, former Anheuser-Busch CEO August Adolphus Busch IV was arrested after police say he tried to fly a helicopter while allegedly intoxicated. Officers reported Busch had "mumbled and slurred" speech to the point "it was difficult to understand" and that he was unable to follow some directions.

Police were first called with a report of a helicopter landing in the parking lot of an office complex. Police notified the FAA who advised they would investigate. Police were notified again because witnesses said the pilot appeared to be too intoxicated to fly.

When officers arrived, Busch was armed…

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Descend To What Altitude?

Descend To What Altitude?

During a recent descent, I was faced with a difficult decision about what altitude I was supposed to descend to.

I had been cleared to "DESCEND VIA" the ANTHM3 RNAV into KBWI. As you can see from the image, the lowest altitude listed for landing to the east is 4000' MSL, and I had 4000 in the FMS and Flight Control Unit as we descended through FL180 to meet all the crossing restrictions.

There were some pretty severe storms in the area and the image shows (don't laugh at my crude colors) a cell between ANTHM and ROKTT and FLAAG.…

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Ready For A Break From The Summer Heat?

Ready For A Break From The Summer Heat?

This past winter, general aviation pilots around the Northeast had the opportunity to purposely land on an icy runway. The snow was plowed to create a 2300' x 100' runway for about a two-week window in February. This provided recreational pilots a destination in Alton Bay, NH to land their piston aircraft on a frozen lake surface and enjoy a warm beverage and cider donuts.

Within the same winter season, professional flight crews had the opportunity to evaluate how the new RCAM values were applied in their operations. Looking back at your flight operations, did you hear RCAM numbers reported…

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More Articles ...

  1. Out And About Personal Security
  2. TALPA Update Meeting 2017
  3. LAMP - Another Acronym To Remember
  4. Regulatory Reform
  5. TCAS Resolution Advisory in IMC
  6. Medical Divert Procedures
  7. Dry Ice Dangers
  8. Human Factors and ADS-B
  9. It’s All Greek To Me - Multiple Language Users on the Same Frequency
  10. New OSHA Fall Protection Rule - Are You Compliant?
  11. Big Sky, Little Airplane
  12. Loss of Control Leads to CFIT - Part 2
  13. "Maintain Vertical Speed, Maintain"
  14. Loss of Control Leads to CFIT - Part 1
  15. "Traffic, Traffic"
  16. What Do We Really Know About the NTSB?
  17. The Most Important Sign At The Airport
  18. When Was The Last Time You Gave Your Passport A Checkup?
  19. Canadian Climb and Descend Via Phraseology
  20. Flying High . . . Almost
  21. Let The Buyer Beware
  22. Taking A Closer Look At Applying Temp Comp
  23. Part 135 Operators SMS in Europe Requirement
  24. It's Not Snowing Yet, But . . .
  25. What You Need to Know About the Updated FAA AC 120-95A on Portable Oxygen Concentrators
  26. Training to Obtain LOA C063
  27. 33 Years In The Making: The Pilot's Role In Collision Avoidance, Part 2
  28. 33 Years In The Making: The Pilot's Role In Collision Avoidance, Part 1
  29. Are You Ready For OSHA's June 1, 2016 Hazard Communication Deadline?
  30. Did You Know MNPS Is Over?
  31. CPDLC-DCL in the NY Metropolitan Airspace
  32. OSHA'S Hazard Communication Standard Deadlines
  33. CPDLC - DCL Coming to an Airport Near You in 2016
  34. ADS-B OUT Exemptions for 2020 Deadline
  35. NAT RLatSM Briefing 2
  36. Cuba Update
  37. Flight Standards Inspector Resource Program
  38. Losing Control
  39. Let the Winter Games Begin!
  40. Book Review - Sway: The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior
  41. Book Review The Glass Cage: Automation and Us by Nicholas Carr
  42. Human Intervention Motivation Study (HIMS) Interview
  43. Transponders ON
  44. Are you SMART?
  45. A Potential Killer Waiting to Strike
  46. 2015 IS-BAO Revisions Affecting Training
  47. Grace Provisions
  48. FMS Approaches
  49. Keeping Up: 2015 IS-BAO Revisions Are Issued
  50. Book Review: Pilots In Command Your Best Trip, Every Trip

Follow The Agonic Line

The Agonic Line blog focuses on aviation training. Advanced Aircrew Academy brings you articles written by subject matter experts in their field on topics of interest for business aviation flight department managers and pilots. Through insightful content it is our goal to reduce declination and show the course direct to true north on aviation training issues.

Agonic Line - An imaginary line on the Earth's surface connecting points where the magnetic declination is zero. The agonic line is a line of longitude on which a compass will show true north.